Paper House Making at SIUE’s Fall Art Therapy Conference

October 2, 2012

This past week-end I enjoyed spending time with art therapy graduate students and faculty at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville as part of their 2012 Fall Conference.  It was a great couple of days featuring two of my passions in art therapy:  an evening presentation about my interest in community organizing  through social media and online art collaborations, as well as an all day workshop about my clinical work with youth survivors of domestic violence.

Saturday’s workshop included art-making time focused on creating paper houses as a way to explore and introduce themes related to finding safety through art.  It was exciting to see the different houses, environments, and additions students made from the variety of awesome materials provided.

Even more exciting was when we brought our individual houses together to create our own safe village full of creative and vibrant energy (!) :

Houses come together to create a vibrant & creative village!

If you’re interested in learning more about this art intervention and the steps involved to make your own paper house (or village!), my download on SlideShare about Paper House Making with Youth Exposed to Domestic Violence can be accessed here:

Thank you to SIUE’s Student Art Therapy Association and faculty for a great conference and visit!

About these ads

3 Responses to “Paper House Making at SIUE’s Fall Art Therapy Conference”

  1. sian maclean Says:

    Thank you for your blog and for sharing your wisdom. It is indeed inspiring. I continually look forward to the latest entry showing up in my inbox. Love this intervention; the village is wonderful.

  2. Hannah Says:

    Gretchen–I like how you took your work with survivors of domestic violence (the exhibit in your previous post) and extended it to educating other professionals about domestic violence. A powerful and inspiring sowing of seeds! I would like to try using the paper house in the hospital context, so I’ll play with it and see what directions it could take for illness, trauma and grief. I think your words “finding safety through art” applies to just about every context.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 702 other followers

%d bloggers like this: