Posts Tagged ‘DIY’

Creating a Kids Dreamcatcher [How to] : Coping with Bad Dreams & Nightmares

August 24, 2013

In my children’s Trauma & Loss Art Therapy groups, we explore common trauma reactions that can surface after something bad, sad, or scary happens that takes away a child’s sense of safety and security in their world.  I often use trauma informed children’s books such as Brave Bart or A Terrible Thing Happened to help introduce and educate children about the different emotional, physical, and behavioral responses they may be experiencing.

As described in both stories through the characters Brave Bart the Cat and Sherman the Raccoon, one of the traumatic stressors can be difficulty sleeping or becoming afraid to go to sleep because of nightmares and bad dreams.

I find creating dreamcatchers are an easy, fun, art-based activity to make together as a group, as well as provide a creative, meaningful way to address fears and worries related to exploring this topic.

Kids really enjoy learning about the Legend of the Dreamcatcher before we start creating:

“According to legend, the good dreams pass through the center hole to the sleeping person, The bad dreams are trapped in the web, where they perish in the light of dawn.” ~Lakota (Sioux) Dreamcatcher Legend

 

Creating a Kids Dreamcatcher [How to] : Coping with Bad Dreams & Nightmares | creativity in motion

When introducing dreamcatchers, I often prepare paper (or styrofoam) plates (small or large in size) by cutting the center out, and punching holes around the edge.  Kids can also help and do this part too! The circle form can then be decorated with markers, oil pastels, foamie shapes, paint, or collage. Yarn is used next to thread through the punched holes, creating a criss cross pattern back and forth over the center of the circle to create the dreamcatcher’s web.  A small piece of yarn is left hanging off the circle’s edge, where a series of pony beads can then be strung together. To complete the dreamcatcher, a few feathers can be securely attached inside the bead’s inside to hang down. Some dreamcatchers have multiple beads and feathers attached to the bottom.

Creating a Kids Dreamcatcher [How to] : Coping with Bad Dreams & Nightmares | creativity in motion

My Dreamcatcher Example

Step by step photo tutorials and other ideas when making paper plate dreamcatchers can be also be seen here, here, and here if you are interested in seeing more examples!

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My Trauma Informed Pinterest Board

More Gluebook Goings On @ 6 Degrees of Creativity 2

October 11, 2012

 It’s time for another gluebook round-up and inspiring happenings from my 6 Degrees of Creativity 2 e-workshop Creative Goodness with Gluebooks!

I am excited to share only a sampling of the books, pages, and ideas being created from workshop participants (!) :

Nancy’s Gluebook

Nancy Lautenbach facilitated a file folder gluebook project with a workshop she offered for Arts at Smith student orientation with the theme of managing the upcoming year.  The gluebook above is Nancy’s example that she made for students. You can see more of Nancy’s pictures from this gluebook workshop on her Flickr Set

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Janet’s Gluebook

Janet McLeod has also been busy with file folder gluebooking in New Zealand!  On her blog Positive Art Therapy, Janet posted how she has used her file folder gluebook to explore her Ikigai and the intentions Create, Inspire, Share, Care and Be. Learn more about this gluebook’s theme by reading Janet’s post My Ikigai: What gets me up in the mornings.

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Hannah’s Gluebook Spread

After receiving some inspiration from a NY Times Arts article, Hannah Klaus Hunter decided to dedicate her gluebook theme to all the art exhibitions around the country she wants to visit in 2013.  Read more on her blog and post Gluebooks on the Move.

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Emma’s Gluebook

Emma Parker continues her pages in her gluebook created from envelopes at Stitch Therapy Headquarters in the UK.  On this spread above , Emma uses a page from an old nurse’s dictionary combined with fiber art.  Follow Emma’s gluebook happenings and stories on her blog here.

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Gluebooks from Natalya

Natalya Garden-Thompson was inspired by the brown paper bag gluebook idea to start experimenting with it in her adult art group for storytelling.  Check out this beautiful pic of Natayla’s embellished brown paper shopping bags drying in the sun in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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Jolie & Sandhya Digital Smashbooking

Inspired by the Paper Stash Swap we had in September, Jolie Buchanan and Sandhya Artique have taken this activity to a new and virtual level!  They have both been collaborating on & exchanging “digital paper images” with one another to use in their smashbooking.

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Susanna’s Gluebook Pages

Another upcoming collaboration within the Creative Goodness with Gluebooks Workshop is a gluebook page exchange this November.  The photo above is a batch of gluebook pages received from Susanna Suchak this week from Ontario, Canada.  Participants in this exchange are creating a series of 5 x 7 gluebook pages that will be swapped with other community members next month!

I’m excited to see what continues to develop over the last few months of this workshop. Thank you to all the workshop participants for sharing their art, inspirations, & ideas!

Peacemaking & DIY Papermaking

September 15, 2012

Inspired by my work with and the mission of Peace Paper, over the last few months I have been incorporating handmade papermaking with some of my art therapy work with youth who have been impacted by trauma and loss.

One way we used the transformative process of papermaking over the last few months included expressing some of the emotional burden of experiencing or witnessing someone being bullied. Youth ages 6-12 created and then tore up images and hurtful messages about bullying to destroy in a blender for pulping.  The pulp from this was then used to form new sheets of handmade paper that would become decorated as Peace Flags.  The process of destructing the negative & re-constructing it into something positive was really powerful.  The Peace Flags also served as a visual reminder and a way to dialogue about how each of us can choose to engage in peaceful and less hurtful behavior with one another.

Below is a short video I created about this process:

If you’re interested in learning more about the papermaking steps I implemented, feel free to check out this DIY Papermaking How-to Sheet that you can save, download, or print out through SlideShare:

Also check out the work of Peace Paper, their papermaking tools, tutorials, and resources at www.peacepaperproject.org.

When it’s hot…Make some paper!

July 8, 2012

Over the last week it has been increasingly hot here…with temperatures heating up to 100 degrees at times.  It’s finally cooled down a little, but on a couple of these hot days I’ve pretty much remained inside when I could, with thankful thoughts for central air conditioning, crossing my fingers for the power to stay on, and using the time to engage in some art-making!

After returning from the GMU Papermaking as Art Therapy for Trauma Intervention workshop, I was inspired and curious to discover how I could set up a DIY papermaking space that would be mobile and easily accessible for papermaking.

I’ve been gathering materials we talked about at GMU that could be used for adapting to this process if you don’t own or have access to a  Hollander Beater:

  • Wooden stretcher bars, mosquito netting, window screen for creating DIY mould & deckles
  • Blender for re-purposing paper material into pulp
  • Specialty pulps to add to the blended paper mix for strengthening

I used a variety of paper material in making this batch of pulp: magazine photo collage,  handwritten content, some extra pulp I saved from this papermaking experience, and added a little bit of specialty pulp: denim, cotton rag, and wool.

 The transformation begins!

Using my handmade mould and deckle (stretcher bars & stapled window screen around the frame), I pull a sheet!

Wet paper in need of drying enjoys the extreme heat on our sunroom windows

Paper!

I’m excited to be teaming up again with Margaret Mahan and Drew Matott for some Peace Paper fun and papermaking inspired activity as part of this year’s Buckeye Art Therapy Association SymposiumReleasing and Reforming: Art Therapy as Social Action, September 6-8, 2012 in Dublin, Ohio.

September 6 will include a pre-conference course: Papermaking as Art Therapy for Trauma Intervention that will provide attendees with an understanding about how the papermaking process can be beneficial with populations as a form of social action and therapeutic transformation in trauma and loss intervention.  During this course, participants will be provided with a closer look at the papermaking process as they create handmade sheets of paper from pulp (with a portable Hollander Beater) collected along Peace Paper’s travels, explore concepts related to art as transformation and how this media can be implemented further with various art therapy settings.

On the evening of September 7 there will be a presentation highlighting lecture and visual content related to utilizing papermaking and creative expression as a cathartic process to give meaning, create transformation, and provide empowerment through releasing and reforming fibers into new stories and new beginnings.

Saturday morning September 8 will include an artmaking workshop inspired by concepts and intentions dedicated to social action, peacemaking, and using papermaking as a transformative media for self-expression and making Peace Paper Flags to explore reflections, intentions, and expressions for peace and change using handmade paper created from Peace Paper’s recent travels.

Check out the all the inspiring presentations and offerings at this year’s Symposium here.  Registration is now open!

We hope to see you there if you can make it!

Getting Ready: Gluebooking, Paper Swapping, Page Exchanging & More

May 26, 2012

I just finished up my video tutorials and PDF download  for my 6 Degrees of Creativity 2 workshop Creative Goodness with Gluebooks.  It was a lot of fun to put all the content together and get it ready for its July 1st debut.   This online workshop not only includes an introduction to making gluebooks &  gluebook prompts to work on, but also an August paper stash swap and November gluebook page exchange with other workshop participants.

Gluebooking Fun Begins in July!

In preparation for this workshop I’ve been collecting even more paper stuff to use as a way of documenting my activities, interests, plans, and inspirations through the concept of gluebooking.  I’ve been a lot more mindful of the paper around me (even the most mundane and ordinary scraps, notes, & clippings) and how I can transform these into sharing an experience, memory, feeling,or something special I want to remember through gluebooking.

One of the gluebook spreads I worked on yesterday included a lot of the findings I brought back home from my travels last week such as local maps, a farecard ticket, baggage tags, images from a visitor guide, handmade paper, and more.   It was a creative way for me to continue to process the experience, as well as create a meaningful representation through all the various things I saved.

Stash Swapping & Page Exchanging!

I am so looking forward to seeing what gluebooks & gluebook spreads are created by others involved in this workshop, as well as exchanging some gluebook pages and stuff from our paper stash!    Lots of creative goodness!

The creative goodness doesn’t stop with this workshop either: there are five additional workshops and instructors part of the 6 Degrees of Creativity 2 experience!    Yay!  Join us starting in July for our 6 month virtual art making adventure & creative community.   Registration is open until June 30, 2012.

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