Posts Tagged ‘dr. bruce perry’

The Art of Relationships in Trauma Informed Work

May 18, 2018

This week Dr. Bruce Perry was here in Cleveland again (!) and I was fortunate enough to be able to attend his all day training focusing on the Six Core Strengths for Healthy Childhood Development. Inspiring, as always! Much of what he spoke about reinforced the immense power relationships have in trauma informed care. I compiled the notes I took from Dr. Perry’s lecture into some art with a few of (the many!) takeaways I wanted to remember about this topic:

Notes inspired by Dr. Bruce Perry, Cleveland 5/15/2018

  1. Relationships are more important than any adversity. Multiple adverse circumstances or experiences can be buffered by the healthy, positive relational connection in our lives.
  2. We live a relational driven life- our relationships with others impact us the most.
  3. The nature and number of healthy, positive relationships we have is key to our resilience, healing and recovery.
  4. Human beings are relational creatures and our behaviors, actions, feelings, and experiences are contagious to others.
  5. A trauma informed community and relational milieu is a healing community.
  6. Relational health = the degree of our internetwork of connectedness (Relational Poverty vs. Relational Wealth)
  7. Communication is all about rupture + repair, disconnection + connection — it is essential to explicitly acknowledge our differences, assumptions, implicit biases to build relationships.
  8. Therapeutic dosing and therapeutic spacing is important to provide tiny, repetitive doses of engagement, distancing, then re-engagement to support change.

Check out this Child Trauma Academy Resource of many of the slides and content presented during this training.

As an art therapist, I also reflected on how art-making, the creative process, and trauma intervention through art therapy supports relational considerations presented by Dr. Perry.  Art therapy “effectively supports personal and relational treatment goals” (The American Art Therapy Association) through:

  • Creating and/or re-establishing a safe space to explore feelings, responses, and experiences through active engagement in “bottom up” sensory-based intervention that supports lower parts of the brain where trauma resides;
  • Making art together in groups, families, and communities can foster healthy interactions, connectedness, and a sense of belonging that transcends language;
  • Art therapy creates opportunities to explore themes of deconstruction and reconstruction through the art making process and offer insight into internal and external communication, conflict, biases, and relational restoration;
  • The nature of art making with an art therapist offers repetitive, patterned, and parallel action while safely regulating and managing traumatic stress and triggers that could activate ones response system
  • An opportunity to build and strengthen resilience through meaningful art-based interactions and interventions that explore safety, change, vulnerability, and regulation.

Thank you Dr. Perry for returning to Cleveland and another great day of trauma informed learning!

 

Related Posts

Reflections on Art Therapy, Trauma, & Group Work

Top Ten Takeaways : PEP Symposium Dr. Bruce Perry in Cleveland (2013)

Top 10: Impact of Trauma and Neglect on the Developing Child with Dr. Bruce Perry (2012)

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Top Ten Takeaways : PEP Symposium Dr. Bruce Perry in Cleveland

October 19, 2013

I was very grateful to be able to spend an entire day at a Symposium organized by Cleveland’s Positive Education Program featuring Dr. Bruce Perry.  It was inspiring, validating, and stimulating to hear him speak again on so many topics I enjoy learning about and try to implement into my trauma informed work and work as an art therapist.  Below are only some of the takeaways and reminders I received from the day that I wanted to briefly share here:

BDP1018

Top 10 Takeaways

My Top Ten Takeaways:

6 R’s: Relational, Relevant, Rhythmic, Repetitive, Rewarding, Respectful

Side by Side (parallel) vs. Face to Face

Regulate –> Relate –> Reason

We are relationally contagious

Regulation = Safety

Power of Rhythm: Best way to regulate

Relational rewards vs. Value rewards

Neuroplasticity

Stress: Unpredictable (vulnerability) vs. Predictable (resilience)

Spark

 Principles of Brain Organization and Development | Dr. Bruce Perry, PEP Symposium Cleveland

Principles of Brain Organization and Development

  • 6 R’s: Relational, Relevant, Rhythmic, Repetitive, Rewarding, Respectful:  These 6 R’s are what Bruce Perry identified at the beginning of the day as core considerations for trauma informed care when implementing therapeutic interventions and experiences.  I try hard to be mindful of these R’s through providing art interventions and experiences that introduce and/or strengthen these areas. Art expression and the creative process is a great companion to so many of these!
  • Side by Side (parallel) vs. Face to Face:  In our interpersonal experiences with one another, being present in parallel or working, walking, (and I will add art-making!) together side by side better supports regulation and relational enrichment in comparison to being face to face from one another.
  • Regulate –> Relate –> Reason:  Therapeutic experiences should begin with a state of regulation (feeling safe) to then build on creating relational enrichment and understanding.
  • We are relationally contagious:  Our environments and the people who surround us influence our own behavior, values, and understanding of the world.
  • Regulation = Safety:  When we are regulated, we feel safe.
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Dr. Bruce Perry’s 6 R’s

  • Power of Rhythm: Fostering relational rhythm through movement, music, breathing, and other safe patterned sensory based, neural experiences is the best way to create, instill, and maintain regulation. I believe art-making is also an important sensory based experience where rhythm can be cultivated to soothe heightened states of arousal and trauma reactions.
  • Relational rewards vs. Value rewards:  The stimulation of reward to the brain is a strong motivating factor.  Relational (relationships and attachments) rewards can struggle with or override value based rewards (individual beliefs, attitudes).
  • On Stress and Vulnerabilty vs. Resilience: When stress is unpredictable, severe, and prolonged this fosters vulnerability.  When stress is moderate and controlled, this fosters resilience.
  • SPARK:  Dr. Perry referenced and recommended checking this book out several times during the day.  “SPARK is the first book to explore comprehensively the connection between exercise and the brain”.
photo

Super nice way to end the day!

It was an honor to hear Dr. Perry speak again and look forward to him visiting Cleveland again soon to keep learning and being inspired by all the work he does!  You can learn more about his work, publications, research, courses, and upcoming events via The Child Trauma Academy.

Related Posts:

Top 10: Impact of Trauma and Neglect on the Developing Child with Dr. Bruce Perry

Finding a Safe Place: Creating Safety for Domestic Violence Survivors through Art

My Trauma Informed Pinterest Board

April: National Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month

March 28, 2012

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month.

The start of April is only a few days away and in this post I wanted to provide a head’s up and share some resources, information, and some local professional events in my area recognizing National Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families website, National Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month is “a time to recognize that we each can play a part in promoting the social and emotional well-being of children and families in communities“.  The site’s Child Welfare Information Gateway includes a free 2012 Resource Guide: Preventing Child Maltreatment and Promoting Well-Being: A Network for Action (as well as other resources, tip sheets, and tool kits) that organizations and providers can use to support their advocacy, prevention, and intervention work with youth, parents, and families around the issues of child abuse and neglect.

There are also Treatment & Trauma Informed Care Resources on the Child Welfare Information Gateway about “building trauma-informed systems, assessing and treating trauma, addressing secondary trauma in caseworkers, and trauma training” that are also worth a look.  Sites such as Child Trauma AcademyNational Child Traumatic Stress Network, and The National Center for Trauma Informed Care are included as additional resources to check out.

In the Greater Cleveland and Lorain County areas there are two upcoming events (with early bird deadlines quickly approaching!) focusing on Child Abuse Prevention that I am looking forward to attending:

  • Lorain County Collaborative on Child Abuse Awareness and Prevention 7th Annual Child Abuse Awareness Conference on April 18th at Lorain County Community College’s Spitzer Conference Center in Elyria, Ohio.  This full day conference includes offerings focused on family violence and child abuse prevention, human trafficking, investigations, and childhood trauma. In the morning, I will be providing a 2 hour presentation highlighting the benefits of using art therapy in trauma intervention with children.  Early Bird Conference Registration before April 11th is $40. After April 11th: $50.  Discounts available for students and agencies who send a group of staff members. Continental breakfast, lunch, and continuing education available.  For more information, visit this event page from the Nord Center.

  • Power of Prevention Conference hosted by Cleveland’s Domestic Violence & Child Advocacy Center, April 24 will feature an all day workshop and luncheon with national authority on childhood trauma, Dr. Bruce Perry at Landerhaven in Pepper Pike, Ohio.  Dr. Perry is a Senior Fellow at the Child Trauma Academy and is the author of The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog and Born For Love: Why Empathy is Essential and Endangered.

This conference’s theme will focus on:

  • Effects of Trauma & Neglect on the Developing Child
  • Relational Health and Development
  • Impact of Abuse, Neglect & Chaos
  • Developmental trauma strategies: Program & Policy
  • Effects of Empathy on the Developing Brain and Q & A
  • Difference between maternal and paternal parenting styles with emphasis on developing a father’s empathy

To attend the luncheon only (1 CEU) is $40.00, the workshop & luncheon together (5 CEUs) is only $60.00 before April 13th and $75.00 after.  On-site parking is free and a continental breakfast, as well as lunch are provided. CEUs available.  Visit DVCAC’s website to register or to download the conference brochure.

Both of these conferences are super affordable, include continuing education, and a great line up of content about children, family, trauma informed considerations and more if you are able to attend!

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